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April 27, 2007

Comments

Hi!

This is one of the best posts of this blog, and usually they are very good.

One of the main problems in that transition from MS Office to OOo is the total lack of empathy of many IT managers. They are unable to be in the shoes of the people who is doing the transition, the users. The worst is that many of them are proud of that.

They are programmers or sysadmins but many times they don't need to do office work. They work with computers and that's all. The rest of us, we must do our jobs *and* work with computers, and nobody asked if we wanted to work with them.

Javier

Hi Javier,

Thanks for your comment. You're right that there can be a certain amount of techie pride in remaining separate from or not spending enough time understanding the problems of the users.

If working with a computer is in one's job description, though, then there's an obligation to learn to use that tool to the best of one's abilities.

Solveig

There is one reason why employees may resist OpenOffice which you have not mentioned. Many employees think that being fluent with MS Office will assist them in their next job, and they feel that learning OpenOffice skills is therefore a negative career progression. This is particularly the case with temporary typists. It is therefore important to emphasize to staff the future importance of having OpenOffice skills given the recommendation/mandating of the native OpenOffice formats by various local and national governments. Having both MS Office and OpenOffice skills will definitely increase someone's employability over just knowing MS Office.

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Nice post.

[...]If working with a computer is in one's job description, though, then there's an obligation to learn to use that tool to the best of one's abilities[...]

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